Make the most of your combustion engines

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alitech
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Mon Oct 14, 2019 11:41 am

They are going to be history soon!

:) :) :) :) :( :( :( :( :(
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Alitech
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Arbabwiz
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Joined: Mon Oct 14, 2019 11:54 am

Mon Oct 14, 2019 11:54 am

What about the recharging time? There is always some planning that needs to be done ahead of time to get enough charge for your drive. In otherwords, there is one more thing you have to be conscious of with EVs.

How quickly does it charge? When I need gas, I can find gas stations everywhere.

With gas powered cars you get more freedom, it's one less thing occupying your mind. Just like when I am outside and thirsty, I can turn up at any Tom, Dick and Harry market or any superstore and find water. Same logic applies to combustion engine.

How many EVs charging station are out there on an average, let's say within every 5 miles radius in any major city?
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alitech
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Mon Oct 14, 2019 11:55 am

Hey Arbabwiz. Welcome to the community.

You have a number of questions in your post. Let's tackle them :)

1. Charging times: Charging times for EVs have been the biggest fear and obstacle for wide adoption of EVs. This is rapidly changing and technology is paving the way for super-fast charging on the go as we speak. If you look at the latest charging speeds for let's say the Tesla model 3, it charges at almost 250kwh and can give you up to 70 miles in 5 mins. A full top-up can take 20 mins. That is insanely fast and not very far behind a gas top-up. I will try to quote some news articles to back this up.

2. Charging stations: Across the west (this covers the vast majority of US and EU markets) there are fast-charging stations being set up by all sorts of providers. A huge amount of gas stations are also being retrofitted with fast chargers. BP and Shell are investing in fast chargers that go up to 200kwh. That is insanely fast. Tesla has by far the biggest EV charging network in the world and has in fact opened its network to other car manufacturers. Please do a google search for where you are located and see how many pop up in your neighborhood within 5 miles, that should answer your question.

3. The convenience of fossil fuel: Fossil fuel will remain a big part of motoring for a while still as it provides the most convenience. There are gas stations everywhere and a long road trip is not an issue for anyone. There is a new term that EVs have created and its called "range anxiety" (how far can a single charge take me). This range anxiety is quickly diminishing as the range of modern EVs are almost hitting the range of traditional combustion engine vehicles. We now have EVs that will go up to 350 miles on a single charge. That tops a lot of medium-sized family cars.

A few pointers:

Most people do a daily car run of a maximum of 100 miles. That's really stretching it. This includes going to work socializing, the gym you name it. Only a handful of people really go beyond that on a daily basis. Today's EVs will easily cover that with a single charge.

Most EV owners will charge their car at home overnight as that is the cheapest way to run your vehicle. With peak and off-peak rates from energy suppliers, it's getting even cheaper.

There is a lot more to say but I'll end it here for now to gauge your temperature :)
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Alitech
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Zulfiqar
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Mon Oct 14, 2019 11:55 am

Technology of charging is still a bit behind in charging compared to fossil fuel as it doesnt allow you the freedom.

Example,

If you take your average tesla, nissan, chevy into the serengeti or kalahari, there are no charging stations, your only surviving chance is using a petrol/gasoline fired generator feeding your electric car while you setup fort to protect yourself there.

Tech has come ahead, I wish it can come so far ahead that even us in the south of US can do 500 mile trips on a single charge, distances here a killer, e.g

In texas just the I-10 highway east to west is 880 miles, thats a lot of miles I know but people do that in a shot.

Now what will really get some gears turning is get the electric vehicle bubble out of rich people pockets and make it commercial like the ancient GMC trucks from the early 1900s or make heavy haulers (tractors, lorries for you englischers, and shaheena for my arabian friends) into diesel electric like trolley buses for the highway.

After such, the advancement of EV can be realized.

Right now its a 1st world thing only and as we know the 2 biggest names in auto, Toyota and Mercedes Benz didnt just build their history on first world deliveries.

Their vehicles are globally recognized as perfectly usable for their build and they supply service/spares everywhere.

E.g. you may not be able to find a bottle of water at an african trading post but sure as rain you will find a toyota genuine part engine starter for the beat to hell land cruiser you just drove in.
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alitech
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Mon Oct 14, 2019 11:56 am

Hi Zulfiqar.

Thank you for your contribution. I understand where you are coming from and agree with most of what you have just said. EVs are mostly a first-world luxury at this time, but as more and more governments set targets for EV adoption, gasoline counterparts will become even cheaper.

The examples you have given are pretty extreme and the likelihood for western EV users falling into those situations is pretty low.

I think it would be safe to assume that this community (evdomination.com) will mostly cater to western EV owners or enthusiasts. It is definitely the future of motoring. The one major exception is China where things are rapidly picking up and it is now the largest market for EVs in the world.

Have you looked at any EV options that you might be able to consider at some point in the near future?
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Alitech
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Zulfiqar
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Joined: Mon Oct 14, 2019 11:06 am

Mon Oct 14, 2019 11:57 am

I have not yet bought an EV as I buy cars at diminished value, all the old Nissan Leaf are junk now as they have aircooled batteries and TX heat is considered worst than mid east.

Neighbor had a Tesla S 90 that was written off in hurricane harvey and the guy didnt have gap insurance so he got really really stitched up on the payout. (His new purchase of a cheap econo car was close to mid size luxury priced because he had to tack the loan to the new car loan).

Anyway, Ill probably find an old tesla S (black nosed one), cheap one which requires work and rebuild it, mostly to use as a toy.

:)

As Houston is managed by idiots, my immediate next vehicle right now would be something that can ford rivers reliably. (Our stupid city floods a lot now).

Electric vehicle with taller clearance and sheds off water, sign me up please.

I have quite a number of charging stations near my home, usually empty because low number of evs and they are a bit pricey too, people charge at home mostly.
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Zulfiqar
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Joined: Mon Oct 14, 2019 11:06 am

Mon Oct 14, 2019 11:57 am

Come on guys,,,

Even if you own an electric golf cart..

Its still an EV.

I personally love electric fork lifts, lower air cleanup cost in warehouses.
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